Personal Marijuana Limits in Michigan

Since 2008, Michigan residents have been able to legally access marijuana via the state’s medical marijuana program. In 2018, they voted to extend marijuana access to all adults age 21 and over by passing Proposal 1 – a historic piece of legislation that made Michigan the 10th state in the nation to legalize recreational cannabis.

Like the other states with recreational cannabis programs, there are limits on how much marijuana a person may purchase and own at one time in Michigan. These personal possession limits are similar to those in Oregon, Washington, and Colorado which define how much cannabis an individual may own.

Currently, recreational cannabis isn’t for sale in Michigan. At the time of writing, experts expect Michigan’s first recreational dispensaries to open their doors in early 2020. Until that day, recreational cannabis is still legal for adult use in Michigan and their possession limits are in full effect.

As prospective recreational marijuana customers, it’s important for Michigan residents to understand the personal possession laws before they buy cannabis. Failure to adhere to the state’s regulation can lead to legal trouble, including hefty fines.

Michigan Personal Marijuana Limits

Michigan Cannabis Possession Laws

The possession laws for recreational and medical marijuana in Michigan are different. If a person has a medical marijuana card, they are subject to a separate set of laws than those purchasing marijuana recreationally.

Recreational Cannabis Limits in Michigan

According to Proposal 1, anyone age 21 or older in Michigan may legally possess no more than 2.5 ounces of usable cannabis in public. Once dispensaries open their doors it is unlikely customers will be allowed to buy more than 2.5 ounces in one transaction due to this regulation.

The laws are different if someone’s storing their marijuana on private property. In Michigan, adults age 21 and older may keep up to 10 ounces of usable marijuana in their private residence without incurring penalties from state law enforcement.

Adults in Michigan are not limited to buying dried cannabis ‘buds’ or flower. In fact, the law explicitly allows concentrated cannabis, edible products, and personal cultivation.

In Michigan, adults of age may have up to 15 grams of concentrated marijuana at a time. The law also allows adults age 21 and older to cultivate up to a dozen cannabis plants in their home without facing penalties.

Recreational Cannabis Laws in Michigan at a glance:

  • Legal for adults age 21 and over
  • Adults of age may carry up to 2.5 ounces in public
  • Adults of age may keep up to 10 ounces at home
  • Home cultivation is legal for up to 12 plants
  • Concentrate possession is legal, up to 15 grams

Medical Cannabis Limits in Michigan

If a person qualifies for medical marijuana in Michigan, they are subject to different regulations than recreational customers. Individuals with a state-approved debilitating condition may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana and equivalents in any form.

For example, medical marijuana patients may keep up to 16 ounces of marijuana-infused edibles in solid form, 7 grams of marijuana-infused products in a gaseous form, or 36 fluid ounces of marijuana-infused liquid products.

Patients with qualifying conditions make cultivate an possess up to 12 marijuana plants, as long as they are not grown in plain sight in our kept in a locked, enclosed growing facility. Patients that require assistance from a caregiver can extend their possession limits to a specified individual who will be allowed to possess up to 12 marijuana plants and up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana.

Medical marijuana possession limits in Michigan do not include incidental or minimal amounts of stocks, stems, seeds, and roots.

Purchasing Recreational Marijuana in Michigan

At the time of writing, there are no legal places to purchase recreational marijuana in Michigan. Michigan’s Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs board is currently developing the legal framework for the states recreational cannabis program, but it may take up to a year to finish.

Until the framework is finished, the state is not administering licenses for recreational dispensaries. Currently, reports are predicting the first recreational cannabis dispensaries to open in Michigan in the early months of 2020, but the state hasn’t confirmed dates for the first organizations to open their doors.

Driving with Cannabis in Michigan

When a person is driving in Michigan, the state’s public possession laws are in effect. This means a person may carry up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana in their car as long as it is in a sealed, labeled package. Drivers are not permitted to smoke and drive or drive under the influence of edible marijuana.

Medical marijuana patients are required to transport their cannabis in a sealed or labeled package in the trunk of their car, or another location that is not easily accessible from the interior portion of the vehicle. If a medical patient violates these regulations, they may face a fine of up to $250.

Driving while under the influence of marijuana is strictly prohibited in Michigan for recreational and medical patients. Michigan treats drivers under the influence of cannabis similarly to the way they handle drunk driving arrests. Violators will face substantial fines and could even incur jail time as punishment for driving under the influence of marijuana.

Under no circumstances should a recreational or medical patient drive and consume marijuana at the same time. Doing so can and will result in legal trouble if it doesn’t end in an accident or worse. With dozens of ridesharing in public transportation options available, it’s smart for cannabis users in Michigan to stay safe and follow the law when they consider driving while under the influence of marijuana.

Cannabis Property Brokers

If you are considering entering the Michigan commercial marijuana industry contact us, we’ve done all the homework to ensure a quick launch for your start-up.

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